Jennifer Shimp and Dan Bradley named 2023 Mentors of the Year

Every year, we honor a Year One and Year Two Mentor as Mentors of the Year. While we celebrate the hard work and dedication of every Chicago Scholars Mentor, our Mentors of the Year not only embody our CS Way Values, but go above and beyond for their Scholars every day. This year, we’re thrilled to honor Year One Mentor Jennifer Shimp and Year Two Mentor Dan Bradley. 

Inspired to mentor the next class of Chicago Scholars? Click here to learn more about our application process. 

Jennifer Shimp is a veteran Chicago Scholars mentor and is currently mentoring a cohort of Year Two Scholars. Read her Q&A below to learn more about her experience as a mentor.  

 

What does it mean to you to be named Mentor of the Year? 

Receiving the Mentor of the Year is an unbelievable honor. Chicago Scholars is such an amazing and unique organization and I feel so fortunate to have gotten to know many of the talented Scholars, co-mentors and CS team. It is a privilege to share my time, work and life experience to help in some small way that the dreams and goals of the Scholars become reality.  

 

What is your favorite thing about mentoring Scholars? 

The best part of being a Chicago Scholar mentor is getting to meet the Scholars at New Scholar Orientation (NSO) and see them develop confidence in themselves, learn and capitalize on their unique “superpowers” and provide support as they complete their college and scholarship applications and prepare for their interviews at Onsite. It is so exciting when the acceptances, financial aid and scholarships start coming in which will determine where they take the next step in their college and career journeys. I enjoy staying in touch and continuing to see their growth through college and beyond.  

 

Why should someone become a Chicago Scholars mentor? 

Others should get involved with Chicago Scholars for many reasons, but the most important reason is to support young adults navigate the college access/acceptance process. Supporting their journey changes lives as well as those of future generations. They are the leaders who will be impacting our future!  

I still can’t believe that the Scholars in my very first cohort are just about to graduate from college. I love that the Scholars reach out periodically to ask for advice or just share updates.  

 

Would you like to share something you’ve learned from your Scholars? 

Two of the attributes of the Scholars that have impressed me the most are their perseverance and resilience. Many of them are relatively new to this country, many do not have big support networks, if at all. They have come through the isolation and challenges of the coronavirus and have other struggles but they work incredibly hard and take advantage and support of the Chicago Scholars program to make their future goals come true. It is so exciting to learn about the ways that they plan to make the world a better place.  

 

 

Dan Bradley is a veteran mentor who is currently working with a cohort of Year Two Scholars. 

 

What does it mean to you to receive this award?

I feel very humbled to be recognized with this award as I know how many extraordinary CS mentors — both that I’ve volunteered alongside or interacted with from a distance — are incredibly deserving of the recognition. I hope that I am able to adequately speak on behalf of the inspiring and diverse community of CS Mentors who make it a priority in their lives to encourage, support, and celebrate the efforts and talents of our scholars. It has always been my goal as a CS mentor to offer a positive influence, however small or large, in my scholars’ lives during a critical period of young adulthood. I believe that this award represents that the collective impact of the many contributions CS Mentors offer our scholars is far larger and more meaningful than we may appreciate in the fleeting shared moments together. To me the award also represents the irreplaceable support CS Mentors receive from the tireless efforts of the CS Staff. I would not be the CS mentor I am today without the year-round dedication and investment CS Staff make in both scholars and mentors to prepare us to be successful in our work together. 

 

What has been the best part of being a CS Mentor?

It is a bit surreal to realize the first cohort of scholars I worked with will now be heading into their senior undergraduate year. The years have flashed by. I am so impressed by how our scholars have navigated challenges and flourished as undergraduates. My favorite moments include witnessing the transformation scholars undergo — often between their second semester and the end of the year — when they begin embracing their identity as a college student with newfound confidence. I know it has occurred when scholars begin sharing their outlets to inspire new individuals to pursue educational goals. This drive to inspire and support others is what I believe is at the root of the transformational power of Chicago Scholars. 

 

Why should others get involved with Chicago Scholars’ work? 

The people of Chicago Scholars — scholars, staff, volunteers, and supporters of all types — deeply believe in the transformational mission of the organization. Anyone seeking to experience or contribute firsthand to the incredible impact higher education has on individuals and broader society will find a welcome home in Chicago Scholars. As a mentor you are trusted with playing a critical support role as scholars transition between high school to their first year as an undergraduate. The expectations for mentors are set high because Chicago Scholars attracts people who can meet them and provides the training to set individuals up to be successful. Becoming involved with Chicago Scholars’ work means you will find yourself as a member of this talented, driven community committed to transformation.   

 

What is something you learned from our Scholars or from being a CS Mentor? 

I’ve learned that it is never too early or too late to open yourself up and offer guidance, support, or a caring heart to another person. You don’t need to possess all of the “right” answers — or even all of the “right” questions — to make a positive impression and offer encouragement to another. You start simply by showing up, honestly sharing your experiences, and being willing to learn and grow. Setbacks or missteps are an inevitable part of everyone’s growth and development. These alone should not and will not dissuade anyone with the genuine desire to help people progress toward their set goals.  

 

Contact

312.784.3300

thankyou@chicagoscholars.org

Chicago Scholars
247 S. State Street, Suite 700
Chicago, IL 60604

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Contact

312.784.3300

thankyou@chicagoscholars.org

Chicago Scholars
247 S. State Street, Suite 700
Chicago, IL 60604